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There are many ways to publish your book. Years ago, our hands were tied. Nowadays, it’s different. We now have the power to do what we used to rely on the publisher for.

Self-publishing opens up a whole new world of options for the authors of today. And one of those options is audio books.

Terry Kate knows all about this, so much so that she’s running a WANA International class to show you how.

I’ll let Terry explain…

Audio Books are NEW to You

Well not as listeners, but as authors. Audio has not been an option for any and all authors till now. The possibility is there for every author, as long as they hold their audio rights there is nothing stopping you. Which I think as a listener and audio producer is the greatest jump start and opportunity in publishing now.
So to help those ready to take the plunge I am teaching a class through WANA International. There are rumors everywhere about this and that element, the process, and it is a whole new world. How do you pick a narrator? How much does it cost? Where do I go? Well, to my online class might be a great first step.
I throw out the pros and cons on all sides as the class is also open to voice talent. How does the business work and how to make your move? When? Now, now, now! Get in the game early, carve out your place in the market, and if you light that fire under your bum you could have an audio book for the holidays!
So join me Wed 10th  8:30pm EST – http://wanaintl.com/?page_id=13&ee=55
Or Sat 13th 12:30pm EST – http://wanaintl.com/?page_id=13&ee=62
Catch the sound wave people! Get the best voice talent by moving fast and get in on the ground floor.
Donna, thank you so much for having me on your blog! I look forward to any questions your readers have for me.
Okay guys, what are you waiting for? Go and book your seats now. And as Terry’s thrown down the gauntlet to answer any and all of your questions, why not ask some?

If you want more of me, try checking out: FacebookTwitterGoogle+InstagramYou Tube, and Linkedin.

Join my email list and be first to hear about upcoming releases and offers.

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Okay, today I have been busy finishing my novel, and now I have to go pack for my holiday. So, I’m passing the reigns.

Now, I won’t tell you how I stumbled upon Peter Koevari’s post, Authors and Piracy, eBooks on the high seas,  – but it was funny.  Anyway, I really liked it and wanted to share it with you guys. So, I illegally downloaded it for publication here. Later on I’ll be touring London, selling it on printed flyers for the small fee of 99p. Just to be clear, the author will be receiving none of this fee…. but Shhhh – don’t tell anyone.

I couldn’t think of a better titled that Peter’s, so I stole that too.

Over to you, Peter.

I am going to tackle what I think is a very important topic for Authors and creative artists. I’m going to talk about Johnny Depp piracy!

It’s a funny thing, piracy (aaaarrrg!), as we live in a world where it is very easy for people to jump onto torrent and release sites and download whatever they want, for free. Most people accept that this is the case and at some point in their lives, have likely done it themselves.

What if we got you as a reader, and a room packed full of people and asked the question, “Raise your hand if you have *never* downloaded absolutely anything illegally or broken copyright laws. Never copied a movie in a VCR, photocopied copyrighted material, bought anything pirated, downloaded an image and used it on a blog from google images, or absolutely anything that can be considered a breach of copyright?”

I would be surprised if any hands went up, and I would be floored if a number of hands went up. Do I endorse it? Absolutely not, but you can’t change the world… you can only adapt.

Lady Gaga was quoted to say that she is happy for people to download her songs, as she makes all of her money from touring anyway. This is not such a case for us as authors, is it?

We don’t “go on tour” to sell out tickets to our shows and make a huge packet, do we?

So, why did I bring this topic up in the first place?

Because I googled my book title with a timeframe of the last week, and discovered that my books have been pirated. Was I happy about it? Of course not, although the attention is flattering.

The funny thing about everyone who pirates is, it doesn’t bother them and they have all sorts of justifications for pirating… and that is all well and good, until it’s *their* work that is being pirated. They don’t slave over manuscripts for many years to write a novel, pay editors, cover artists, work every day to promote their novels. No, they enjoy reading the books that other people produce… just like we all do as readers.

After all, pirates are just regular people, but with a different perspective and values. Do I consider them criminals? No. Do I want to run out there and track down everyone who downloaded my book illegally and persecute them? No.

You may be looking at me in shock and horror, but why on earth would I want to ruin someone’s life over copyright laws, for wanting to read my books?

Let us face the reality about the argument of potential sales: It’s flawed.

I put pirates into a few categories:

A) Pirates who NEVER buy what they download

B) Pirates who download to try without paying, and then go ahead to buy what they really like

C) Pirates who buy what they really like, and pirate what else they can, because they can and they may want to look at it later.

D) Pirates who (for whatever their circumstantial reason) cannot afford to buy the things that they want.

E) Pirates who cannot buy what they want, due to restrictions

The pirates who are in category A, will never pay for our books. Are they a lost sale? No. Are we losing money because they download our books? No. Are they still ripping us off as authors? Yes… but what exactly can we really do to change it?

The best we can hope for is that they tell their friends and families about our books (if they enjoy them) and some of them may want to buy them.

Pirates in category B, will try our books without paying for them first. If they like them, they will probably purchase them… but likely not.

Category C is similar, but the stuff they hoard and download will likely never be seen or read, but will definitely be shared.

Category D is a tough one. I mean, at the end of the day… just because we can’t afford to have something, doesn’t give us a justification to take it without paying because we want it. However, people do what they need to do and although we don’t like it, there are some real reasons why people would like to genuinely buy something, but the way they need to purchase it deems it “not viable”. Does it excuse it? No… but we can understand it. We can hope that those readers do help us as authors by spreading the word about books that they like, and when they get into a position that they can afford it, they support us as authors.

Category E concerns me greatly, and the fact that people can’t buy ebooks over the Internet, due to restrictions is just ridiculous. We should all push for any companies who do that, to change.

Whatever category these pirates are in, it does not matter, they are going to do what they do, regardless of what we try to do about it. People who would buy our ebooks and paperbacks will still do so, even if the availability of our books on pirated channels would make them more accessible for free. Not everyone pirates, and lots of people out there like to support authors and keep them writing.

For any pirates out there that think all eBooks should be free, I would like to ask you… would you go to work from 9-5 for no paycheck at the end of the day? I doubt that you would, but if you are happy to work all your life for no money, then you can stand tall with that argument.

For those Pirates that say that Authors are the real pirates for controlling their work and restricting what you can do with it… I really question that. If you buy my paperback, you can sell it, share it, sleep on it, use it as a paperweight, throw it in the air… I really couldn’t care less what you do with it… but I do hope you share it with your family and friends.

eBooks are usually considerably cheaper than paperback editions, and I have not put DRM on my ebooks (Can’t change the kindle Legends 2 edition when purchased from Amazon, they wouldn’t let me undo it). Although I don’t encourage emailing my book to every man and their dog, I see no reason why you couldn’t share the read in the same manner as a paperback.

As for the analogy of people buying ebooks and that they can’t sell it as they would a car, that is an interesting one. There is no real “second hand market” for digital works. Like second hand video game stores, further sales only profit the people trading in them… not the makers of the game. The same applies with eBooks.

Why would someone want to buy a second hand eBook when they can just buy it online themselves? We’re not talking cars worth huge money, are we?

Writing books is hard work and we work for nothing until we make any sales on our books. I am an indie author, what does that mean? We don’t get fat pay cheques from publishers, and we have to pay our own way and promote our own way for my books to be successful. Unlike movie studios, we don’t make millions or hundreds of millions in sales.

As much as the world is what it is for pirates, it is what it is for authors. We write for you, the reader, to enjoy our stories. If we all stopped writing, there would be no more books to read.

Having said all of this, what disappoints me the most… is that if any of these pirates bothered to come to my site and contact me, asking if I can give them my ebooks for free… I would have offered them an honourable deal of giving them my ebooks in return for an honest review. The act of pirating my ebooks is an unnecessary exercise of breaking copyright laws and using torrents or hosting sites.

I would love for pirates to consider buying my books and sharing them with their friends and families, but it is their choice if they wish to support me as an author, or not.

As a result of all of this, I stand by my words and I have put up a page on this very website that clearly offers review copies of my first book, Legends of Marithia: Prophecies Awakening (Uncut and Extended Second edition) to anyone willing to show some class and honour, and review my books for me on Amazon, Goodreads, etc. No need to break laws or illegally distribute my books!

It shows that you respect me as an author, and I will… in turn, respect you as a reviewer and respect your opinion. I don’t care if someone is a pirate or not, the offer is open to you equally.

If you decide to change your approach and buy my books (before or after you have read them, and however you have obtained them. eBook or paperback), then you have my gratitude for supporting me as an author.

Do you have an opinion on this? Have you had this happen to you? Comment and talk about it.

Follow Peter on twitter @Peterkoevari

If you want more of me, try checking out: FacebookTwitterGoogle+InstagramYou Tube, and Linkedin.

Join my email list and be first to hear about upcoming releases and offers.

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I recently read a blog post ‘What Makes a Male Character Swoon Worthy?’, and loved it so much, I asked the writer, Jillian Dodd, if she would like to write more on the actions of the perfect man; for me.

Over to you, Jillian:

In my book, That Boy, the main love interest in the book is a boy named Phillip. Phillip is pretty dreamy. A lot of readers ask me if a man like Phillip really exists. I always have to answer yes. Phillip shares many characteristics with my own husband. In the upcoming sequel, That Wedding, Phillip shares a pros and cons list he made when deciding if he should tell his best friend that he was in love with her.

I got to thinking about my husband’s pros. So many of the things he does just make me melt.

He was so proud when our daughter was born

He’s the best kisser. Ever. We had a scheduled first date. I had met another guy that I was kinda going crazy about and almost cancelled our date*. I’m so glad I didn’t. When he kissed me, I knew.

He rubs my face to relax me.

He lets me pout to get my way.

He’s okay with the fact that our daughter has him wrapped around her little finger.
 
His muscles.

The way I feel safe in his arms.

How he always rescues me; Flat tires, snow storms, big spiders.

I’m horrible to buy presents for. I snoop. I look at our online banking. I try to trick the kids into telling me, but somehow he manages to surprise me every year.
 
He’s always warm.
 
He always gives me his jacket or sweatshirt if I’m cold, even if it means he gets cold.
 
He’s like my very own Ken doll. He lets me pick out all his suit, shirt, and tie combos.
 
When we were dating, we went snow skiing. It was my first time, and it was super cold. I hate cold. He took my mittens off on top of the mountain and blew warm air into them to warm my hands up.

Enjoying life with my brother at a Husker Bowl game

He’s a busy stressed executive, but he always puts our family first.

He lets me wear his sweatshirts when I’m sick.

He always smells amazing. Specifically his neck.
 
He lets me sleep in late.

He supports my wild ideas.

He didn’t laugh at me when I told him I was going to write a book. He made me finish.
 
He brings me real hot chocolate, the steamed milk yummy kind, in bed.
 
He drives me around to see Christmas lights every year, even though he doesn’t get the big deal.

He makes me laugh.

He puts gas in my car. My car is always empty.

He takes my car to get washed.
 

With my daughter at the lake, after she caught her first fish and she wanted to eat it. He talked her into throwing it back after the photo.

He orders pizza for the kids when I’m tired.

He lets me take really long baths with no interruptions.

He spends numerous hours with my son, working on his go kart, so my son can live his dream.

He buys me chocolate.

He looks equally sexy in a suit as he does in a tshirt.

He loves football as much as I do.

He celebrates life.

He never lets a waiter take his order first. Ladies always order first. Same thing for doors.

He is the dish fairy at our house. I hate emptying the dishwasher and love it when I open it up and the dishwasher is empty. He always tells me the dish fairy came.

He folds a perfect towel. Mine are always messy, whereas his look perfect.

With my son, spending lots of time so he can pursue his dream of racing professionally

He cleans out the shower drain.

He sold his race car to buy my engagement ring.

He doesn’t put up with my shit.

We’ve lived in many homes and in numerous cities, but it never matters. Home is where he is.

.

*You can read that story at http://jilliandodd.wordpress.com/2011/09/07/first-kisses/

For more information on Jillian, check out the following:

Website www.jilliandodd.net
Twitter www.twitter/JillianDodd
Blog: http://www.jilliandodd.wordpress.com


If you want more of me, you can also find me on
FacebookTwitter, Google+ and Linkedin

So, what special things does your partner do for you? How many of the above can you tick off? What qualities do you find attractive in a man? What/who is your ideal partner? Let me know. Let’s see if we can find someone more dreamy that Jillian’s hubby 🙂

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Recently, I was researching something for a character of mine and I came across a really interesting article by Steven Aitchison. So, I quickly emailed and asked if he would be a guest blogger. And guess what, he was more than happy to.

Over to you, Steven:

Your eyes can tell a lot about you and tell others even more simply by the way you use them.  Eye communication is a great skill to have and eye contact is a great tool to master.  We all use it and we all give away vital clues as to what we are thinking with our eyes.

References are made to our eyes in everyday conversation such as ’she has bedroom eyes’, ‘don’t give me those puppy dog eyes’, ‘giving me the evil eye’ and many more such phrases.

If you can learn the skill of reading eye signals and mastering the art of using eye contact it can make a huge difference in your personal and business life.

The Pupils

Your pupils and the size of them will give away a lot of secrets, and it’s something we can’t do much about. The pupils will either constrict or dilate depending on our state of mind. If we are aroused by something, or someone, our pupils will dilate and if we are turned off by something or someone our pupils will constrict.

Skilled street traders across the world look for the size of the pupils when bartering with their customers. If a customer sees an object and their pupils are fully dilated, then the trader knows they can keep the price of the item at the higher end.

When we are excited by someone we like, our pupils will dilate, and when we are in the company of someone we don’t like, our pupils will constrict.

Take a look at these two photos. Which one do you prefer?

eyes1

The first photo shows the pupils constricted and the second photo shows the pupils dilated. The one with the pupils dilated would normally be the one that people picked, as it is more seductive and deemed more attractive when the pupils are dilated.

Next time you are talking to someone pay attention to the size of their pupils, don’t go right up to their face and make a nuisance of yourself, but just casually watch the size of their pupils. This will tell you what excites them when they are talking, it might also tell you if they like you or not as we can rarely hide our emotions with our eyes.

Different Types of Eyes

Wandering Eyes

Have you ever noticed when you are talking to someone that their eyes are looking everywhere and not at you. This in itself is an obvious sign of distraction or boredom however, it also means that the person is looking for a way to get out of your space. Looking out a window when someone is talking to you could mean they would rather be outside.

If you do this, be careful of the signals you are giving to the other person, unless you specifically want them to know you don’t want to be with them.

angryWhen we are angry our eyes become narrower, brows are furrowed and our pupils constrict. It’s quite easy to tell if someone is angry when they have all of the above. what if they don’t show the above body language signals? Well, we have to look for other body language clues such as constriction of the lips, flared nostrils, staring, clenching of the jaw etc.

When you are speaking to someone who is displaying signs of anger you can either back down or stand up for yourself, depending on what the situation warrants.

If you stand up for yourself you should be holding eye gaze and not break it. This shows the other person that you are not intimidated by them. If you are the one to break eye contact in a heated argument you have all but lost the argument.

The Seductive Eyes

It’s quite easy to tell if someone likes us by the size of their pupils. In a well lit room, if you are speaking to someone face to face you can see the size of the other persons pupils. If the eyes start to dilate they are interested in what you have to say or they find you attractive.

seductive eyesHowever, this is not so true in a darkened room like a nightclub as the size of our pupils will dilate to let more light in, in order to see better in the darkened room. So be careful to read the signals correctly before making a fool of yourself.

There are other ways to seduce someone with your eyes. The classic Lady Diana look with her head down and eyes looking up was one of the reasons so many people warmed to her. This type of look makes the observer feel more maternal or paternal and also brings out the protector in men which made Lady Di more attractive.

Your Gaze

When we are talking to our friends and in social situations, and are looking and talking with another person for some time we unconsciously gaze at the persons face in a controlled manner. However, if we have lost confidence or we are not yet socially adept we can lose this ability.  Here is a quick guide on where to focus your gaze when talking to someone.

Social Gazing

When you are speaking in a social setting you don’t want to stare into someone’s eyes as this is a bit strange for someone to do, and a bit off-putting for the talker. To get over this, use a triangle approach. First look at one eye of the talker, then look at their mouth, briefly, and then move onto their other eye. This shows you are still interested in what they have to say as you have not looked away from their face.

The Flirty Gaze

When we flirt with each other the eyes still move in a triangular way but with more range, downwards. I know the women reading this will have experienced men who think you are talking from your breasts, which is quite disconcerting, and I’ll explain a possible reason for this, apart from the obvious. However, we all do it, men and women, only women are better at it.

It has been shown that when we are walking toward each other from a distance, men and women, automatically check each other from head to foot. First time to check the sex of the person and second time to check the sexiness of the person.

Men are more likely to get caught checking out a females body, rather than looking them in the eye, because they have less peripheral vision than women. Women can look you in the face but still look at your body  because their peripheral vision is much better.

Our eyes contain two types of photo-receptors; rods and cones. Rods are responsible for scotopic vision, dark adapted vision. They also predominate the peripheral vision and women have more rods in their eyes than men do; hence why they have better peripheral vision and are better at seeing in the dark.

The Controlling Gaze

If you are looking to intimidate someone when you are talking to them, or are trying to control the conversation look at the area known as ‘the third eye’ which is the spot just between the eyebrows.

Many men do this to try and intimidate the people they are talking to and to try and control a conversation.

Can you tell if someone is lying with their eye movements?

Short answer to that is no. However, by looking at other body language signals and looking at their eyes you can get a good idea if someone is lying or not.

With the work of Bandler and Grinder and their excellent work on NLP we have an idea of how our eye movements relate to how we access information from the brain, which can help to tell is someone is lying or not.

Visual Accessing cues

(VC) Visual Construction: Looking up and to the left. The person is accessing information from their imagination andmight possibly be making it up. For example, if you asked someone what their dream home would look like they would, more than likely, look up and to their left.

If someone is lying about something and making stories up they might be using this eye movement.

(VR) Visual Remembering: Looking up and to the right.  This is when we are actually accessing a memory and picturing it in our heads.  It is more than likely that this is a memory that actually happened.  Ask your friend what they had for dinner yesterday and they will most likely look up and to the right.

(AC) Auditory Construction: Looking middle and to the left. This is where our eyes might go if we were constructing a sound in our mind.  For example if you asked a friend to think of what their voice will sound like when they are 80 years old, they would more than likely look in this direction.

(AR) Auditory Remembering:
Looking middle and to the right.  This is where our eyes might go if you were remembering a sound that you have heard before.  For example ask your friend what the sound of their partner sounds like and they will more than likely look in this direction.

(K) Kinesthetic: Looking down and to the left.  This is the direction your eyes might go if you were accessing your actual feelings about something.  For example, if you ask a friend about their feelings on the issues of capital punishment their eyes might go in this direction.

(AD) Auditory Digital: Looking down and to the right.  This is the direction our eyes might go when we are talking to ourselves.  We do this all the time and it is called self talk.  Believe it or not we talk to ourselves a lot and we can learn a lot about ourselves by paying attention to our self talk, but that is for another article.

The information above represents the majority of people, but it may  be different for some.  However, it is still possible to work out a persons representational system by observing them when you ask them questions.

Using the information above should get you started on the road to being able to read people using their eyes as signals. Remember, as with all body language signals, that they should be read together and not separately.

About Steven Aitchison

I am the creator of Change Your Thoughts (CYT) blog and love writing and speaking about personal development, it truly is my passion. There are over 500 articles on this site from myself and some great guest posters.

If you want to learn more about my products you can check out CYTGuides.com or check out my books and Kindle books on Amazon

* * * * *

So, writers. Do you use these signs when writing your characters? Did you even know what most of them meant? Do you look for these signs when speaking to others?

If you want more of me, try checking out: FacebookTwitterGoogle+InstagramYou Tube, and Linkedin.

Join my email list and be first to hear about upcoming releases and offers.

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I had to get the 'Supernatural' guys in here somewhere. Can you spot them?

I write books and I write teleplays, and as I blog quite a bit about the novel side of writing, I thought it was time I delved into the script side of writing.

Well, actually that is a little bit of a lie. I asked a friend, who is an expert on the subject, if they would like to write a guest blog and they agreed.

Let me introduce Win Shields. I first met Win in February at the DFW Writers Convention. He is an amazing man with an amazing background. His career as a staff writer for Universal Studios has enabled him to work on every show imaginable including eighties favorites Charles in Charge and Murder She Wrote.  He has also worked alongside some of televisions greatest actors such as Bill Cosby, Martin Sheen, Jack Klugman and Walter Matthau.

A producer and director of classic plays for television, Win now runs his own production company in Texas.

Enough said. Over to you, Win. Tell us how to write for Television.

Staff writing for television is a specialty craft that is not widely promoted. The main reason is because it is so lucrative a job, and one that is so hard to get, that there is little or no need to promote it.

Back in the 50s, Steve Allen said “In order to be a staff writer for television, you have to be either an Irish Catholic or an Eastern European Jew and you must live in Los Angeles or New York City.”  That certainly sounds as if the industry was bigoted; however, there was a different reason for it.

Staff writing is a high paying job, so many people want to do it.  It is also very demanding. Producers are very reluctant to hire anyone unless they are sure the person can and will do the job. The only way to be sure is to either know the writer extremely well or have them recommended by someone whose judgment is trusted. Going “door to door” with a resume or portfolio will do no good. If a writer is creative enough to do the job, they are capable of writing an imaginative resume. As for the portfolio, the questions that come up are:

  1. Did this person really write this?
  2. How long did it take the person to write this?
  3. How many people read this and suggested changes to this person?

A staff writer must be able to put out a complete show every week.  While there are usually five writers on a staff, each writer must carry his/her own weight.

In the 50s most producers in the US were Irish Catholics or Eastern European Jews. They were not bigoted; however, writers who were members of these ethnic groups would see these producers at least once a week, often going to other events where they would see and be seen by these producers. When I started writing in the 70s, I found the secret to success was still to be in the right place at the right time.

While it is currently true that to get a job writing for a major production in the US, one must live in Los Angeles or New York City, there are people who have been working for the last couple of years to change that. It is my opinion they will succeed within the next year or so. This will give people who are interested in doing this kind of work sufficient time to get into a position to get the jobs.

Have you ever heard someone say “I wrote an episode for a TV series and when the episode came on, it was nothing like the script I sold them.” This is usually followed with “I’ll never write for them again.” Let me comment on the second statement first. If you want to make it as a writer for television, you need to adapt the philosophy that the only reason you would not write for a particular group again would be if their check bounced. People who write for television write for the money. If you want to write for any other purpose – television is not for you. As for the first statement. The people who changed the screenplay (don’t call it a script) are staff writers.

There are really way too many regulations and rules for writing for television for anyone  but a full time professional to know and those regulations and rules (called net specs) change all the time. For instance, when I was writing for Universal Studios, one of the rules was if the show is going to be on ABC, you can’t mention Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell or Pizza Hut, because ABC belonged to Disney, and Disney had an exclusive contract with Coca Cola and those fast food chains belonged to Pepsi. Nowadays, many of those things are not true.

When a new staff writer is hired, they are assigned to a team, usually consisting of five writers. If you are one of those new writers be prepared for the team to give little or no weight to anything you say. It is best during your “apprentice” years to just keep your mouth shut and listen and learn. It doesn’t mean you won’t get to write. You’ll get to write a lot, but be prepared for anything you write to be “voted down.” The other four will give you suggestions but it will be up to you to figure out how to employ those suggestions. The first year or two will be frustrating but you will learn a lot. By the third year, there will be someone new in your group and it will amaze you that anyone could be as young and dumb as that person, even though they will be just as you were two years before.

As I said, there are people who are working to create work using the major studio staff writer system to provide product for the many growing cable channels. Once they start hiring, they will be looking for people who are creative, trained and have an established relationship with people who have credibility in judging talent and skills. Anyone interested in being a staff writer should start preparing now.

One of the problems is know how to get into the right position. Woody Allen said “Those who can’t write, teach and those who can’t teach, coach.” It is certainly true. There are a lot of people out there who are willing to take your money to teach/coach you to being a screenwriter. The problem is once they’ve taught/coached you, you’re  on  your own, which means you’re no closer to your goal then before you put out all that money.

Here’s a little known (or at least little thought about) secret. Those who could really help you don’t need your money. I’m not saying you should not pay to belong to a writers’ organization, writers’ workshop, or to attend writers’ conventions. These are very important ways to network and to meet those who can help you. Consider though, that those who teach at these workshops and conventions are rarely, if ever, paid for their teaching. That’s because these people, who can really help you, don’t do it for the money. They do it because they are creative people who want to help other creative people realize their dream.

You can find Win at Win Shields Productions.

Are you a screen writer? Do you work for a studio or television company? What are your experiences?

You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Linkedin

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